April 4, 2019 Joseph Hernandez 0Comment

The last thing anyone wants to have to deal with is some kind of medical problem. However, it’s a fact of life that you can’t stay healthy indefinitely. But when you first feel something’s wrong within yourself, it can be easy to overlook it or even justify that it’s nothing, especially if you’re currently concerned with your financial status. However, while you might think that not going to the doctor now is a way for you to be saving money, the opposite actually tends to be true for most people. To show you exactly how, here are three ways that ignoring medical issues now can result in more expense for you in the future.

You Might End Up In The Emergency Room

Depending on the type of medical issue you’re having, postponing seeing a doctor could have an immediate and expensive cost to you. Especially if you’re having an acute issue that you’re not taking care of, you could wind up in the emergency room. And according to Debt.org, going into the emergency room is usually much more expensive than going into an urgent care or just to see your doctor. In fact, most urgent care visits-+- range from $50 to about $150 based on what you’re needing to be seen for and what type of insurance coverage you have. But if end up having to go to the ER for something emergent, you could be looking at thousands of dollars. Because of this, it’s a good financial choice to see a doctor before a health problem becomes a medical emergency.

A Worsening Problem Means More Money For Treatment

In some cases, people don’t spend the money to go see a doctor at the first sign of something being wrong because they want to think that the problem will go away on its own or get better over time. And while this can happen in some cases, in some instances, the problem will only get worse. According to SWNS of the New York Post, about a third of people who delay their medical care state that their problem ended up getting worse and needing additional help that they could have avoided had they just been seen earlier. And, generally speaking, more treatments which equates to paying more money.

Failing To Take Prescribed Medication

Another problem people might run into when they think they’re saving money on their medical costs is when they don’t take their prescribed medication. Especially if this medication is meant to help keep you healthy, it’s critical that you take it as prescribed so that your condition doesn’t get worse in the future. But according to Jane E. Brody, a contributor to the New York Times, once a prescription gets over $50, people are much more likely to justify not taking it when and how they’ve been told to.

If you’re trying to save money now by trimming down your medical costs, make sure you’re not doing it to the detriment of your financial and physical health in the future.

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